From Computerworld: Google’s HTC move borrows from Apple’s playbook

Google’s $1.1 billion acquisition of HTC’s smartphone engineering arm is not a direct assault against its chief rival, Apple. But it is a recognition of Apple’s successful strategy.

It is also an acknowledgement that an ecosystem dominated by hardware manufacturers and telecom providers – each with a set of priorities and plans that doesn’t dovetail with Google’s – results in a myriad of devices that run the gamut of quality.

With that in mind, Google’s buyout of HTC’s engineering IP will enable it to create a pure Android play by marrying hardware and software in a move that could eventually reduce fragmentation in the Android ecosystem.

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From Computerworld: Where we stand with messy September Windows and .NET patches

This month’s Windows and .Net patches hold all sorts of nasty surprises — some acknowledged, some not, some easy to skirt, some waiting to swallow the unwary whole. Here’s a quick overview of what’s going on with this month’s missives.

Most important: If you can’t keep yourself (or your clients) from clicking “Enable Editing� in Word, you must install a broad range of .NET patches (if you’re running Windows 7 or 8.1) or cumulative updates (if you’re running Windows 10), like, NOW.

Windows 10 Creators Update version 1703

Cumulative Update KB 4038788, which brings the build number up to 15063.608, has two acknowledged (but not fixed) bugs:

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From Computerworld: Keybase takes on Slack with new end-to-end encrypted team messaging tool

Keybase has unveiled a Slack-style team messaging service that promises to protect private communications with end-to-end encryption.

The company launched in 2015 with the aim of making encryption technology more accessible to consumers. Its latest service, Keybase Teams, has a look similar to Slack with features such as chat rooms and channels. Admins can add set up groups of users to work on a particular project, and encrypted files can be uploaded and shared.

An early release version of the software is now available for download for desktops and mobile devices. 

The key advantage, Keybase said, involves enhanced security and privacy.

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From Computerworld: 53% off Cable Organizer Electronics Accessories Travel Bag – Deal Alert

Do you have a ball of tangled up wires and adapters somewhere in the bottom of your bag? This Universal Electronics Accessories Travel Organizer provides a flexible organization solution for your electronics and computer accessories. It helps make you better organized with all the small items and gadgets.  Made of durable and weather-resistant nylon with well padded semi-flexible covers.  It’s compact size of  8.8“ x W 6.1″allows it to easily stored in you laptop bag or backpack.  This travel organizers typical list price of $18.99 has been reduced 53% to just $9. See this deal on Amazon.

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From Computerworld: 62% off RAVPower 14000mAh Portable Car Jump Starter – Deal Alert

A compact power bank, a car jump starter, and a LED flashlight, all fit into a minimal and portable design. Whether it is your car or your USB devices, never run out of power again. Store it in the glovebox or simply drop it in your bag. Have a concentrated 14000mAh source of power always with you — enough for up to 20 vehicle jumpstarts or many device recharges before the unit itself needs to be recharged. RAVPower’s jump starter typically lists for $160 but is currently discounted 62% on Amazon to just $64. See the discounted car jumper now on Amazon. 

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From Computerworld: Personalized iPhone healthcare for the rest of us? Doctella has an app for that

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From Computerworld: IDG Contributor Network: Microsoft Security stopped being an oxymoron with the acquisition of Hexadite

One of the most frustrating things to watch during the early years of Microsoft (Disclosure: Microsoft is a client of the author) was their lack of interest in security.  It was almost as if, when anyone there heard the term, they’d cover up their ears and say “la, la, la, la, la� until you went away. And, as the century turned, Microsoft security meant anything but security, it was mostly bad joke that hit products like Windows and Internet Explorer particularly hard. But this week’s announcement (ranked as the 3rd most important acquisition this year) they are buying Hexadite showcases that over the last ten years Microsoft made a huge pivot. It finally understood that being unsecure could not only result in massive liability for the firm, but was creating a massive drag on the brand because it reflected poorly on quality. It particularly hurt sales of their products in the enterprise. 

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From Computerworld: How Windows 10 S is different from the Windows 10 you know

The sleek new Surface Laptop comes with it, and so do $300 two-in-one tablet PCs for education. But exactly what is Windows 10 S, and how is it different from other versions of Windows 10?

The “S� in Windows 10 S doesn’t stand for anything, although Microsoft throws around words such as safe, secure, streamlined, superior performance, simple and student to explain it. Standardized and super locked down might be closer to the mark. This is a full version of Windows with some limitations, one that’s designed to start up quickly, have long battery life, and keep working properly month after month after month, without resets or support calls.

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