From TechCrunch: NASA is using Intel’s deep learning to find better landing sites on the moon

 NASA collects a lot of data. It’s one of the main things it does when it’s not landing things on other things. But actually deriving useful information from all the data it collects is another issue entirely, so the space agency has begun enlisting some big tech names like Intel to crunch some of those numbers. That partnership includes Nervana, the deep learning startup the chip… Read More

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From Gizmodo: Food Scientists Have Invented All-in-One Sugar Cream Pods For Your Coffee

Grabbing a quick coffee from a fast food joint means it’s up to you to add as much coffee and cream as you need. But future generations may never need to deal with those tiny, easy-to-spill milk cups as scientists from the Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg in Germany have invented capsules that dissolve…

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From Gizmodo: Scientists Think They’ve Solved an Important Mystery About Brown Dwarfs

Are they stars? Are they lost planets? Brown dwarfs, the galaxy’s dark, wandering orbs, are some of space’s most perplexing features. They’re larger than Jupiter but smaller than stars, glow on their own and, well, they’re just really strange. A new analysis seems to explain at least a few of their mysteries.

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From BGR: This live map shows lightning strikes all over the world in real-time

Everyone loves a good thunderstorm, but they can be hard to come by depending on where you live. If seeing a storm unfold as it happens sounds like fun to you, there’s a seriously cool website that you’re going to adore. The appropriately named LightningMaps.org tracks lightning activity all over the Earth thanks to a massive network of detection sensors, and you can watch it all happen in real-time.

The map, which draws a single slowly-fading dot wherever a new strike is detected, is fed by sensors managed by both weather professionals and hobbyists. The network consists of hundreds and hundreds of sensors located all over the world, and while it isn’t capable of detecting every single lightning bolt, it’s growing to a point where one day it may.

In areas where the density of detection stations is high — as it is across North America, most of Europe and Southeast Asia — the location of new lightning strokes (either cloud-only or cloud-to-ground) can be pinpointed with great accuracy.

If you click on the little antenna icon in the upper right of the screen you can tweak the map settings to show which stations actively detected each individual lightning stroke as it happened. Fair warning: the map can get pretty bogged down if you have all the bells and whistles turned on, so be wary of overloading your browser’s capabilities.

It may not be as cool as actually sitting on your porch while a line of powerful storms rolls through your neighborhood, but it’s a pretty nifty little time-killer nonetheless.

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From Gizmodo: Thrift Store Shoppers Buy $20,000 Worth of Vintage NASA Flight Suits for $1.20

The potential of striking gold at a thrift store can be very much dependent on where that store is located. Given NASA’s Kennedy Space Center is just an hour away, a pair of college students in Orlando were lucky enough to find six vintage flight suits buried in a box at a Salvation Army store that was going out of…

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From TechCrunch: NASA launches satellite to relay data from Hubble, ISS and other spacecraft

 NASA launched a new satellite on Friday morning, aboard a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral. The launch occurred at just before 8:30 AM ET, after a brief delay form its original planned launch due to a minor technica…

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From Gizmodo: Google Found a Way To Automatically and Perfectly Erase Watermarks on Stock Photos

If you’re a professional photographer who assumed that slapping an obtrusive watermark across your work would protect it from being misused online, Google’s got some bad news for you. A team of researchers from the company has found a way to automatically and perfectly erase the watermarks used by popular stock…

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From Gizmodo: Lost for Over a Century, This Is Now the Oldest Known Original Photo of a US President

Lost for nearly a century and a half, a grainy black and white portrait of John Quincy Adams has reemerged—and it’s now considered the oldest surviving original photograph of a US president in existence.

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